RACE: Are We So Different?

Upcoming Programs

RACE: Are We So Different? is an interactive multidisciplinary exhibition that encourages visitors to explore the science, history, and everyday impact of race and racism. Please join us for today’s activities.

 

RACE: ARE WE SO DIFFERENT? EXPLORATION SERIES

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

David HarrisLecture: Law and Order and Race: The Role Race Plays in our Criminal Justice System
Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Law David Harris
7 p.m.
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater
Free; museum admission is not included. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
Despite talk of a post-racial society, race continues to play a role in the American criminal justice system. For the most part, this is not purposeful racism but unconscious bias. Nevertheless, the effects show up in law enforcement practices. We see this in various forms of racial profiling and racial targeting; the enforcement of drug laws; the diminished effectiveness of police; and the damaged relationship between police and those they serve. Ways to address these issues exist; we can do better.

Harris is a Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 AND SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

Spilling InkPerformance: Vishala: Expanse, The Spilling Ink Project
2 p.m.
Carnegie Museum Hall of Sculpture
Free with museum admission
Washington DC -based The Spilling Ink Project, a classical Indian dance company led by Vijay Palaparty and Nalini Prakash, presents Vishala: Expanse. This program premieres choreography specially commissioned by Carnegie Museum of Natural History for RACE: Are We So Different?, in a featured piece called Untitle. Other works, including Ardhanareeswara, showcase the company’s focus on interdisciplinary and intercultural connections.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

WhY? movement logoJames Clarke of the WhY? MovementWorkshop: How to Reach a Sneetch presented by James Clarke of The Why? Movement
2–4 p.m.
Ford-Mateer Classroom
Members: Free; Non-members: $15
Admission to Carnegie Museum of Natural History and RACE: Are We So Different? is included with registration.
James Clarke, CEO of The Why? Movement, leads a seminar-style discussion on psychology- and sociology-inspired “dos” and “don’ts” for communicating with people who seem to hold ignorant or prejudicial views on race. Using Dr. Seuss’ The Sneetches as a critical lens for examining these concepts, Clarke teaches practical communication strategies and social tips for continuing the conversation.

For more information or to register, please call 412.622.3288. The last day to register is September 25.

Note: This program is recommended for participants 18 and older. Registration for this event is entirely non-refundable; no partial refunds are available. Parking is not included with registration.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1

Michele NorrisLecture: Eavesdropping on America's Conversation on Race
Michele Norris
7 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall
Tickets $10-$25; click here to purchase tickets.
Michele Norris is an award-winning journalist with more than two decades of experience. In September, 2010, Norris released her first book, The Grace of Silence: A Memoir, which focuses on how America talks about race in the wake of Barack Obama’s presidential election, and explores her own family's racial legacy. She is currently a host and special correspondent for NPR. Previously, Norris served as co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, public radio's longest-running national program. Her research, writing, and programs about race and racism are world-renowned.

Join us for an evening of thought-provoking discussion. Seating is limited, and admission is by ticket only.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18

Family-focused Event: Genealogy Day
Noon—4 p.m.
Earth Theater
Free with museum admission
Enjoy lectures, demonstrations, and activities that explore ways to research and record your family history. Learn about valuable resources to get you started or to continue your work more efficiently online and in person. Meet genealogy specialists and find out how this topic is related to RACE: Are We So Different? 

 

 

Past Programs

SATURDAY, MARCH 29

Community Voices Gallery Curators’ Talk
11 a.m.
Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, First Floor
Join Lynne Hayes-Freeland and Nikkia Hall as they walk through their process for developing the Community Voices Gallery. This photographic project recreates the Pittsburgh Courier’s “Pittsburghers Speak Up” column, which featured on-the-street interviews by George Barbour and portraits by Charles “Teenie” Harris.

Hands-on Exploration Activities
11 a.m.–4 p.m.
R.P. Simmons Family Gallery, Third Floor
Dig deeper into the subject matter of RACE with ongoing gallery activities. Share in the excitement of discovery as you learn about special topics in science and the various experiences that shape our unique identities.

Cultural Connections Guided Tours
11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m.
Meet at Grand Staircase, First Floor
Explore themes of identity that both define and connect cultures as you journey through Polar World: Wyckoff Hall of Arctic Life, Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians, and Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt. Continue exploring at your own pace when the tour concludes in RACE.

Self-Portrait Making
Noon–3 p.m.
Outside of Earth Theater, First Floor
Create identity-exploring artwork inspired by RACE as the Andy Warhol Museum presents silkscreen printing. Craft your one-of-a-kind self-portrait using various mediums such as fabric markers, yarn, and sequins.

Community Voices Gallery Drop-in Q & A
1–2 p.m.
R. P. Simmons Family Gallery, Third Floor
Visit the Community Voices Gallery to discover how local residents responded to the question “How would you describe race relations in Pittsburgh?” Connect with Lynne Hayes-Freeland and Nikkia Hall as they answer your questions about this project.


SUNDAY, MARCH 30

Hands-on Exploration Activities
12:30 p.m.–4 p.m.
R.P. Simmons Family Gallery, Third Floor
Dig deeper into the subject matter of RACE with ongoing gallery activities. Share in the excitement of discovery as you learn about special topics in science and the various experiences that shape our unique identities.

Cultural Connections Guided Tours
12:30 p.m., 2 p.m.
Meet at Grand Staircase, First Floor
Explore themes of identity that both define and connect cultures as you journey through Polar World: Wyckoff Hall of Arctic Life, Alcoa Foundation Hall of American Indians, and Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt. Continue exploring at your own pace when the tour concludes in RACE.

Self-Portrait Making
1–4 p.m.
Outside of Earth Theater, First Floor
Create identity-exploring artwork inspired by RACE as the Andy Warhol Museum presents silkscreen printing. Craft your one-of-a-kind self-portrait using various mediums such as fabric markers, yarn, and sequins.


SATURDAY, APRIL 12

WQED Film Community Cinema
Noon
Earth Theater, First Floor
WQED partners with the Girls Coalition of Southwestern Pennsylvania to present a free Community Cinema screening of The Trials of Muhammad Ali at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. A feature-length documentary covering Ali’s toughest bout, this film chronicles his battle to overturn the five-year prison sentence he received for refusing U.S. military service. The themes of oppression, race, and resilience featured in RACE: Are We So Different? are mirrored in this poignant film.

Doors open at 11:30 a.m.; the film begins at noon followed by a panel discussion. Pre-registration is required as seating is limited. Registration for the screening of The Trials of Muhammad Ali does not include museum admission prior to the screening. To register, please visit http://www.wqed.org/community/cinema.php.


APRIL 25

Pledge Against Racism
 

Stand with us as we stand against racism. Join the YWCA and Carnegie Museum of Natural History in taking a stand against racism during Stand Against Racism™ Day on April 25, 2014. Visit the exhibition RACE: Are We So Different?, learn the science and history behind race and racism, and pledge to do your part by raising awareness and decrying intolerance.

 

APRIL 26, 27, 30 and MAY 1–4

Silk Screen Asian American Festival
Celebrate cultures of Asia and the Asian American experience through film at the Silk Screen Festival, held this year at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in conjunction with RACE: Are We So Different?. The festival will be held on eight dates during April and May. This is a ticketed event. The film festival is $10/person, or $5/person for museum members. Non-member ticket prices do not include museum admission. All films will be shown in Earth Theater. 

 

Jadoo 

Saturday, April 26, 2 p.m.


Bonta 

Sunday, April 27, 2 p.m.
Thursday, May 1, 6 p.m.


A Time of Quchi 

Wednesday, April 30, 2 p.m


Cheong and Touch of the Light 

Thursday, May 1, 1:30 p.m.


Things Left Behind 

Friday, May 2, 2 p.m.
Saturday, May 3, 2 p.m.


The Haumana 

Sunday, May 4, 3 p.m.


THURSDAY, MAY 29

Dine & Discuss
5:30–7:30 p.m.
Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Meet at Portal Entrance
Free, but registration is required. Space is limited.
Let’s get the conversation started as we dine and discuss RACE: Are We So Different?. 

Everyone has a unique story. Join Pittsburgh teens, currently in grades 8-11, who are ready to get creative and explore race and identity through discussion, art-making, and other fun activities that will unfold during a dinner party that dives in to big ideas.

While you are here, learn more about the Summer Workshop Series on Race and Identity—a special program for teens where you will work with local teens, artists and museum educators over in six workshop sessions that will wrap up with a Youth Summit next fall.

Register by contacting Amber Niedomys, Youth Programs Educator at 412.622.2456 or niedomysa@carnegiemnh.org 

This project is supported in part by the Hive Fund for Connected Learning at The Sprout Fund
HIVE Pittsburgh 

 

Educator Preview
4–7 p.m.
Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Meet at Portal Entrance.
Free, but registration is required. Space is limited. 

You're invited to an Educator Preview for Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s new and exciting exhibition, RACE: Are We So Different? 

Educator Preview Features:

  • Complimentary exhibition viewing—spend time exploring at your own pace
  • Speak to museum staff to learn more about:
    • Summer Field Trips
    • Youth Summit
    • Summer Workshops for Teens

 

Register by contacting Amber Niedomys, Youth Programs Educator at 412.622.2456 or niedomysa@carnegiemnh.org 

THURSDAY, JUNE 12

Film Screening: The New Black
5:30–7:30 p.m.
Earth Theater, First Floor
Free, but registration required. Museum admission is no included.
Doors open at 5:00, with film showing at 5:30 and panel discussion to follow.
The New Black is a documentary that tells the story of how the African American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the gay marriage movement and the fight over civil rights. The film documents activists, families, and clergy on both sides of the campaign to legalize gay marriage and examines homophobia in the black community’s institutional pillar—the black church—and reveals the Christian right wing’s strategy of exploiting this phenomenon in order to pursue an anti-gay political agenda.

Presented in partnership with WQED Multimedia and the Girls Coalition of Southwestern Pennsylvania. Please register at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/community-cinema-the-new-black-tickets-10646173993 

THURSDAY, JUNE 19

Lecture: Why did skin color evolve, and why does it (continue to) matter?
Nina Jablonski, PhD
7 p.m., Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Carnegie Museum of Art Theater
Free; museum admission is not included. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
Variation in human skin color has fascinated and perplexed people for centuries. As the most visible aspect of human variation, skin pigmentation has been used in the past as a basis for classifying people into races. Genetic evidence indicates that similar skin colors have evolved independently numerous times in response to similar environmental conditions and, because of this, skin color is an inappropriate trait for grouping people according to shared ancestry. Hear Jablonski discuss the evolution of the "human rainbow", how skin pigmentation influences our health, and how skin color has influenced societies and social well-being through color-based race concepts.

Jablonski is a distinguished professor of anthropology at The Pennsylvania State University; her groundbreaking research on the evolution of human skin pigmentation is featured in RACE: Are We So Different?. 


MAY 22–JULY 24

Performance: Fourth Thursday Features…
Fourth Thursday of select months
6—7 p.m.
Third Floor Jurassic Overlook
Free with museum admission
Join local artists as they interpret fact, fiction, and contemporary lived experience through spoken word and performances inspired by RACE: Are We So Different? 

May 22

Vanessa German 

June 26

We Breathe the Same Air / We Bleed the Same Blood 

July 24

Becca Mertz and guests 

This program creatively expresses the themes of RACE: Are We So Different?.

Becca Mertz was home-schooled by Catholic fundamentalists and attended Franciscan University of Steubenville until she came out in the MFA program of University of Pittsburgh. She has published more than 100 poems in such places as Drunken Boat, BathHouse, and DIAGRAM. She teaches writing at Duquesne University, and is writing a memoir about coming out in the Christian right.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9

Family-focused Event: Genetics Exploration
Noon—4 p.m.
Free with museum admission
This event is also part of the Super Science Series
Dig deeper into the traveling exhibition RACE: Are We So Different? with hands-on activities examining genetics. Learn about special topics in science such as DNA, heredity, and variation in living organisms. Explore these with educators from Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Carnegie Science Center.


JULY 26–SEPTEMBER 14

Workshop: Reflecting on RACE: A Poetry Workshop with Terrance Hayes and Sheila Carter-Jones
Admission to Carnegie Museum of Natural History and RACE: Are We So Different? is included with registration.
 

Join Carnegie Museum of Natural History and poets Terrance Hayes and Sheila Carter-Jones for an intensive writing workshop as you explore and reflect on RACE: Are We So Different? an award-winning traveling exhibition which looks at the ways science and human history have intersected to inform our understanding and beliefs about race.

During this three-session workshop series you will tour the exhibition, craft your response, gain feedback from fellow writers, and present on your learning at the museum’s poetry reading. The workshop series will be held on: Saturday, July 26 (10 a.m.–3 p.m.); Saturday, September 6 (10 a.m.–3 p.m.); and Sunday, September 14 (1–4 p.m.).

Light refreshments will be provided; lunch and parking are not included. The museum will provide free admission passes for you and two guests to attend the poetry reading at the conclusion of the workshop series on Sunday, September 14.

For information on ticket prices and to register for the event, please click here or call 412.622.3288. The last day to register is July 21.

NOTE: This program is intended for participants 18 and older. Registration for this event is entirely non-refundable; no partial refunds are available. 


SEPTEMBER 14

Performance: Poetry Reading: Reflecting on RACE
1-4 p.m.
Earth Theater
Free with museum admission