Anthropology Dale Mudge and Jim Burke Return Home
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Dale Mudge was very interested in documenting the day-to-day activities of the Inuit elders, in order to study how their traditional ways compared to the daily life of their children and grandchildren. Many of the elders in Sanikiluaq, the community that Mudge and Burke visited, still lived in igloos as late as the 1970s. Mudge gathered the comments of some residents who acknowledged that they probably would not have survived living on the land in their old age:

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"I interviewed 2 elders (women) and their daughters interpreted for me . . . I was interested in the women’s everyday lives;
hard to get them to talk about it . . . they didn’t really see what I was after . . .

"The daughter remembers living on the land. They stopped living there in the late 60s. When asked if they miss it, they do, but feel better as they are warm and recognize they couldn’t live there anymore . . . They enjoyed talking about the old ways and realized these things should be documented and recorded . . ."

Photo: Dale Mudge (right) speaks with Inuit elders Sarah Qittosuk, Sr. and Louisa Ippak with their daughters, Caroline and Mina.

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