Anthropology Dale Mudge and Jim Burke Return Home
spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer

In the early days of exploration in the Far North, long-distance communication was provided once a week, and only in good weather, via Pittsburgh’s KDKA radio station. Now, video conferencing provides a link to the outside world that could not even have been imagined 100 years ago. This picture shows two Carnegie Museum anthropologists speaking to a class of Inuit children via video feed, but video conferencing has also proven useful to the region's minimal health care system, as Mudge observed:

spacer
spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer
spacer

"There is a health care center on Sanikiluaq with a nurse, a dentist comes every 3 months or so, and if a serious medical problem, video conferencing with a doctor for diagnosis can be done, or the patient can be ‘life flighted’ out to a mainland hospital. Once a patient has to be flown out, the plane from Winnipeg takes 5 hours after it is called and 3 hours back to Winnipeg. A doctor comes every 7 weeks or so . . ."

Photo: James B. Richardson III and Deborah Harding of the Division of Anthropology interact with an Inuit classroom.

spacer Back  
spacer spacer
spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer
Carnegie Museum of Natural History Logo